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I AM in Control.org Iowa Adolescents Making Choices to Control Their Future Teen:Health, Relationship, Body and Sexuality

Tag: fitness

Dec 16

Red Bulls® on Monsters® On Red Bulls®: Filling UP your tank with other things.

Posted By iamincontrol | December 16, 2014

Red Bull-gives you wings®? Monster-Unleash the Beast®? These are some of the slogans that the energy of the energy drinks use to their drinkers. Energy drink consumption has increased over the years especially among teens. But more and more information is coming out about its effects. These “uplifting” drinks are actually linked to depression. So, when they say it is bringing you up, FALSE ADVERTISING. According to Poison Control, in three months June-August 2014, over 700 cases of energy overdose occurred in teens—that’s a whole lot.

Here’s what one person had to say about their need for caffeine:

“What I soon began to notice is that when I actually ate my fruits and vegetables, I had a lot more energy than when I grabbed chips and dip with pop. Looking back I never figured out why the vegetables worked better than the pop; we all know that pop contains caffeine and that should give us energy, right? Wrong! The nutrients in fruits and vegetables are so important for endurance, performance, and stamina. Turns out everything I thought Gatorade was doing for my recovery, fruits and vegetables actually do. Too bad no one tells us this in commercials or something we see every day, otherwise I probably would have paid attention more to what I was eating.” -Danielle

Five servings of fruits and vegetables is the recommendation. That may seem like a lot, but there are so many ways to sneak in all kinds without even noticing. Homemade fruit smoothies jam-packed with as many fruits and vegetables you can fit could satisfy the guideline in just one meal. When mixed with everything else, you might not even notice you are eating them. So next time you go for that Red Bull®, think twice about what it is actually doing, it’s not giving you wings.

Dec 9

On this Holiday Season: Change Your Relationships with our Body

Posted By iamincontrol | December 9, 2014

It’s finally the holiday season—-YES!! Just give me that Thanksgiving Turkey, Christmas Cookies, and Candy Canes. I eat just as much as the next person. AND then, New Years Eve hits and say good-bye to the last two months of over indulgences. But recently, I’ve been on this new kick that I suggest we all move to. As you think about those news years’ resolutions, I know many will jump to create a resolution about their body or weight. And it is great to have goals.

            But rather than changing our weight, we need to start creating a relationship with our body. Our body has needs just like everything: it wants attention, nutrients, and exercise. We have to create a relationship with our body. One that treats it with respect by identifying what types of attention it needs. One that gives it foods that help it feel good like vegetables and proteins, rather than sugars and fats that make us feel lousy.  One that moves it to feel better. So this is my new years resolution: To listen to my body and treat it with respect.

Listen to what Gina has to say about this:

“As a kid I was always told I was “big boned.” In grade school, I towered over my peers year after year and even now nothing has really changed—except my weight. At any given point in my life I would have never consider myself “thin” or “skinny,” I was never built to be that way. However, in middle school I gained a lot of weight. Clinically, I was considered obese. Emotionally, I wasn’t happy. Even at such a young age, I realized that I needed to lose weight for my health and my well-being.

Over the course of the next year, I lost weight with the support of my mom and helpful weight-loss programs. I lost the weight slowly and began exercising and learning to eat right.  That was about 10 years ago, and my journey hasn’t ended. I’m still tall, and I’m still big boned, but I’m healthy—and I love my body. I’m still not “thin” or “skinny,” but I feed my body right and try my best to be physically active. All bodies are different; some are thin; some are tall; others are wide; and some are short. As humans we aren’t all made to look the same, but our body’s all deserve mutual respect. With all of the messages out there that are telling us how we need to look, it can be hard to focus on how our bodies make us feel. We will all have days when we aren’t feeling 100% confident in our own skin. But, what’s important is that we do our best to be healthy and treat our body’s right, no matter what the size. “

By Gina

Nov 18

Turnip for what??

Posted By iamincontrol | November 18, 2014

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/15/health/michelle-obama-turnip-vine/

I made an important resolution this summer (only 6 months or so after the New Year—it’s never too late, right?): stop eating like a child.

Remember the movie Elf? My food pyramid has always looked something like Buddy the Elf’s– only replace ‘candy corn’ with ‘candy corn plus lots of those disgusting candy corn pumpkins that start going on sale around Halloween.’ I eat marshmallows for breakfast and am never very far from a bag of my special mix of Twizzlers, pretzels, popcorn, and whatever else I can find in the candy drawer of my kitchen.

 

But I exercise! I drink lots of water! I brush my teeth between snacks! So eating a loaf of bread and a sleeve of Oreos for lunch every day is okay, right?

No. It’s not. It’s so gross!

After a medical crisis in my family this summer, I decided I wanted to take care of my body better. It was finally time to grow up– and ‘turnip.’

The following tips have helped me keep my resolution this fall. Now that I’m making the effort, it’s so much easier than I thought. These small, simple changes have had so many benefits— I can run longer, have fewer headaches, and when that 2 PM lull rolls around, I no longer feel like a nap (well, most of the time).

  • Look at your preferences– and adjust. I started by thinking hard about why I like what I like. For example, is it really candy corn and pretzels that I crave—or is it the act of snacking itself? I realized that if I replaced candy with small fruits or veggies like grapes, blueberries, or baby carrots, I was just as happy to munch away.
  • The 50% Rule. Making sure half of your lunch or dinner is made up of vegetables is an easy way to get in recommended servings. If you’re like me and love carbs like rice, bread, and pasta, mixing in some extra vegetables can be so simple. Add some frozen peas and broccoli to fried rice, or squash to your noodles. Turn that bowl of beige food into something colorful and Instagram-worthy!
  • Come prepared. Sometimes hunger strikes out of the blue. Keeping a healthy snack in your bag—like almonds, a granola bar, or an apple—as a back-up option can help you resist the temptation to buy something close and convenient, like chips and candy or fast food.
  • Be a mindful eater. I noticed that a lot of my extra snacking happened when I was distracted—like while watching TV or out with friends. Simply keeping that in mind was helpful. Before reaching for those chips and salsa or another slice of pizza, I try to ask myself, ‘am I actually hungry or am I just eating because it’s there?’ 
Aug 19

Food is Fuel

Posted By iamincontrol | August 19, 2014

healthy food
By Clancy

My freshman year of high school I was involved in many sports, but it wasn’t until track season that I thought I needed to lose weight. The other girls on my relay team were not the same size as I was. I thought that because I was bigger than them, it was slowing me down. I began restricting what I would eat and when I would eat it. I wouldn’t eat lunch on race days because in my mind, there was a correlation between my weight and my race times.

I was frustrated when my times weren’t improving and thought the only explanation was because I needed to lose more weight. I had already lost around 15 pounds in 2 months, and my coaches began to notice my lack of energy. My race performance actually began to worsen.

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Aug 5

Defying Gender Stereotypes: Muscles are Beautiful

Posted By iamincontrol | August 5, 2014

Girl lifting weights
The results are in!

Last month we asked you guys:

How often to do you see peers participate in activities that are not typical of their gender?

You said:

  • I see it all the time – there aren’t any activities that are “typically” for girls or boys anymore. (0%)
  • Sometimes (50%)
  • Hardly ever (25%)
  • Never (25%)

Here at IAMincontrol we think you should feel free to participate in any activity you enjoy, even if it may not seem “normal” for your gender.  We love Jessica’s take on this below!

By Jessica

I began weight lifting in high school. I did not participate in basketball like most girls, so to keep myself in shape I began using the weight room after school. Often I was the only girl in the weight room, surrounded by sweaty guys throwing weights around.  In order to better fit in with the guys, I began to lift heavier and more often. I saw that they accepted me more and were impressed by what I could do. However, a few girls in my grade commented on my arms or legs and said I was getting “too muscular.” I was proud of my achievements, but I didn’t want to look masculine because that is not what ladies look like. I continued to lift weights, but I focused less on large weights and more on repetition, which resulted in leaner muscles and the “toned” look that girls want.

While I still continue to lift and occasionally will lift heavier, this experience stayed with me and has stuck with me in current weight lifting practices. I’m glad that I started to lift because it led me to pursue an Exercise Science degree and teaching fitness classes. I wish I would have stood up to the girls who made fun of me then because I love my body, and I work hard for my muscles. Every body is different, and whether they have big or small muscles, they are beautiful.

Here’s a website to help when dealing with bullies and a Facebook page for girls embracing their muscles – check them out!

Jul 15

Try New Things

Posted By iamincontrol | July 15, 2014

Girl with soccer ball
By Anonymous

One of the most important parts of my high school career was athletics.  Throughout high school I participated in volleyball, soccer, and softball.  Volleyball and softball had been sports that I had played practically my whole life.  Soccer, on the other hand, I had never competitively played until my sophomore year in high school.  By the end of my three years of soccer I was so sad that it was over.  I had improved so much over that time and wished I could have played longer.  Soccer helped me make strong friendships and a strong body.  I have never been more in shape in my life than when I was out for soccer.

Athletics are a great way to stay in shape, make new friends and spend time with old ones, and also another way to stay out of trouble.  Even if athletics aren’t your forte, there are other high school groups that students can get involved with.  Athletics just have the added bonus of improving your fitness.  My experience also taught me it’s great to try new things because you may find out that you really enjoy it!

Visit this site for more information on extracurricular activities and how to find one that’ll be right for you.

You are in control of trying new things.

May 20

Conquering Over Exercising

Posted By iamincontrol | May 20, 2014

Girl on treadmill
By Savanna

At the end of my senior year, I was off to college. I was starting to feel overwhelmed and anxious.  Not only was I done with competitive sports, but I would be soon leaving all of my friends and family.  With all these new changes occurring in my life, I started to turn to the only things I felt I could control: my diet and exercise.

I started exercising two to three times a day for hours at a time while only consuming around 1,000 calories or less a day.  I soon became obsessed with my body image and couldn’t bear missing a day of working out. I limited my diet to only a few food groups.  With my obsession of exercising and my diet, I started to lose relationships with my sister and friends.  I had no energy to ever do anything and ended up becoming a very negative person.

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Mar 18

Sports Anxiety

Posted By iamincontrol | March 18, 2014

Sports anxiety
By Anonymous

There are plenty of people willing to speak up in favor of the value of participating in high school sports. We’ve all heard about how fun sports are and how they teach valuable skills like teamwork, hard work, and commitment. But for some people, sports can be a source of extreme anxiety and stress. That was the case for me.

As a freshman in high school, I made the varsity softball team. After the announcement was made, I was thrilled and couldn’t wait to get home and try my uniform on. I set the goal to be a four year starter and promised myself I would practice harder and longer than everyone else. My hard work paid off, and I became the starting third baseman. I was on my way to achieving my goal.

Then, during my junior year, everything changed. A new freshman made varsity and she also desired the third base position. I pledged to work even harder and practiced every moment I possibly could. Despite my hard work, I arrived one game to find a Junior Varsity jersey on my seat. I had lost my starting position.

This was one of the most devastating experiences during my time in high school. I cried for days and blamed myself for not working even harder. I became incredibly anxious for every practice and game, afraid that I would make mistakes and never get my position back. So much of my self-esteem and self-worth had come from my softball success, and I began to feel like I had less value as a person. I constantly worried about my softball performance and found it hard to have fun with my friends or concentrate on other activities. I eventually earned a starting spot again the next season, after spending an entire year obsessing over this sport and my worth on the team.

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Mar 13

Unexpected Motivation

Posted By iamincontrol | March 13, 2014

Football player
By Anonymous

When I entered high school, I was overweight and out of shape and started football camp. I was teased by upperclassmen, but instead of just letting them keep making fun of me, I decided to do something about it. I used that as motivation to make a change and started working out daily. I ended up losing 25 pounds by the end of my first semester in high school and I was in the best shape of my life.

By the end of football season, I was playing with the varsity team and making an impact as part of the team. By my sophomore year, I had lost 35 pounds and took the starting varsity spot from one of my teammates who had made fun of me every day the year before. That was a better feeling than any type of payback I could have given him. I was angry, but instead of using violence, I used my anger as motivation. That one year of being bullied as a freshman set the tone for the rest of my high school career and taught me that it is not okay for anyone to be bullied because of their weight.

In my case, if I had not been bullied, I would have been content with being overweight and never would have changed my lifestyle. I still use that motivation in college to not be content with choosing a less active lifestyle and doing what makes me happy. While it’s never okay to bully others, I used the situation to my advantage to make a change. It is never too late to become physically active, and even choosing to take the stairs over the elevator is a step in the right direction.

Bullying is a serious issue across the country, and it is always important to stand up for yourself and be happy with who you are.

Mar 11

FITting In

Posted By iamincontrol | March 11, 2014

Teen male running
By Ryan

Being physically active is important to staying healthy, but for some people, exercise can take over their lives. The story I’m going to share with you is a true story, and I hope after reading my story you will see the difference between being healthy and being obsessed with exercise.

When I was a senior in high school, I became extremely interested in exercise and becoming physically fit. Exercise became my outlet and a place where I felt comfort. I was so interested in fitness that I decided to major in Exercise Science in college. As I began classes, I learned a lot about strength training and living a healthy lifestyle. I would spend 2 to 3 hours every day in the gym working out. I would lie to friends about what I was doing so they wouldn’t ask me to hang out, which would interrupt my exercise routine. I would become very upset and stressed if my schedule changed and I was unable to exercise at my normal time. There were times when my parents would be around the area and offer to take me out to eat, and I would make something up, like “I have class” or “I have work” in order to avoid messing up my schedule. If I missed a workout, my day was ruined and I would think about it constantly.

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